Panels & Roundtables

We are organizing high-quality panel sessions and round tables for both academic and professionals on subjects related to infrastructures for eco cities. All accepted papers are placed in one of the sessions. The main author of the paper has 10 – 15 minutes to present the findings described in the paper. The session concludes with a discussion.

A1: Global cities and global city regions

  • Ben Derudder, University Ghent (Belgium)
  • Peter Newman, Westminister University

What are the characteristics of global cities and global city regions? How have various global cities or near-global cities developed in the past decade, and how will they develop in the future? What does it take for cities to become global cities?

Papers:

  • Changing Connectivity Patterns in de world City Network 2000-2008 (by B. Derudder, P. Taylor, P. Ni, D. Bassens, A. De Vos, H. Hanssens, M. Hoyler, J. Huang, W. Shen, F. Witlox)
  • The Greater Pearl River Delta (PRD) as a global city region its Shape and Development (by J. BIE, M. De Jong, J. TANG)
  • Identifying and measuring dimensions of urban deprivation in Delhi: A town level analysis (by S. Ahmad, M. Choi)
  • The impact of Global Cities’ Cultural Facilities – Inspiration for Shenzhen (by W. Dong, Y. Jiangli, P. Huiqi)

A2: Infrastructure  regulation, governance and management around the world

  • Darryl Jarvis , National University of Singapore

There is a growing body of knowledge on the cross-national comparison of institutional frameworks and policy styles on how governments, authorities and regulators regulate, govern and manage the utility industries and the quality of service provision. This session aims top capitalise on these insights and covers aspects of  institutional and regulatory frameworks, innovative contracting  practices,  opportunistic and strategic behaviour, safeguarding and trading off public values and streamlining investments towards more sustainable urban transport, energy, telecom, waste and water infrastructure facilities.  Both theoretical contributions, in-depth national studies and cross-national comparisons will be warmly welcomed.

Papers

  • Regulatory Opportunism and Concessions in Water Sector Lessons from Water Privatization in Jakarta and Manila (by: Xun Wu)
  • Regulation of Risk and the Emergence of Nanotechnology Governance in Asia: the Case of Taiwan (by: Mika M. Purra)
  • Regulatory States in the South: Can they exist and do we want them? The case of the Indonesian Power Sector (by: Darryl S.L. Jarvis)
  • Network investments within the market paradigm: The smart grid case (by: E. ten Heuvelhof, M. Weijnen)


A3: Sustainable water systems

  • Vladan Babovic, National University of Singapore
  • Margot Weijnen, Delft University of Technology

Water is becoming an increasingly scarce resource, the careful management of which is vital to the citizen’s well-being. This is true both in terms of water resource management and in terms of sanitation services. What problems are different regions experiencing and what policy solutions have been found to deal with them?

Papers

  • Urban Watershed Management: Using Remote Sensing to Implement Low Impact Development (by: T. Davis, C. Jensen, R. Quinn)
  • A policy analysis approach to building a water-saving city in China: a Harbin case study (by: J. He, W. Walker)
  • Optical Research of Water in Eco-City (by: J. Shi, K. Shi)

A4: Infrastructure  regulation, governance and management around the world

  • Ernst ten Heuvelhof, Delft University of Technology

There is a growing body of knowledge on the cross-national comparison of institutional frameworks and policy styles on how governments, authorities and regulators regulate, govern and manage the utility industries and the quality of service provision. This session aims top capitalise on these insights and covers aspects of  institutional and regulatory frameworks, innovative contracting  practices,  opportunistic and strategic behaviour, safeguarding and trading off public values and streamlining investments towards more sustainable urban transport, energy, telecom, waste and water infrastructure facilities.  Both theoretical contributions, in-depth national studies and cross-national comparisons will be warmly welcomed.

Papers

  • Perverse incentives and invisible tradeoffs in subway construction in China: the case of Hangzhou subway collapse (by: Ma Yongchi, Martin de Jong and Xi Bao)
  • The evolutionary path of adopting PPP in the transport sector of China (by: R. Mu, M. de Jong and J. Koppenjan)
  • Grappling with uncertainty in the Long-Term Development of Infrastructure Systems (by: Jan Kwakkel and Warren Walker)
  • Investment appraisal for sustainable ports (by: P. Taneja, M. Aartsen and H. Ligteringen)
  • Vulnerability and interdependency of Critical Infrastructure: a review (by: Li Xiao-Juan and Hang Li-Zhen)

A5 Eco-city concepts and approaches

  • Wim Ravesteijn, Delft University of Technology
  • Philip Cooke, Cardiff University

What visions, concepts and conceptual models have been developed for eco-cities? What eco-city indicators have evolved in various cities and countries around the world? What do they look like? To what extent are they universal and to what extent context-specific? How are they – or could they be – integrated in systems of indicators and in planning approaches? How do they work? What lessons can be drawn from their application in practice?

Papers

  • Evaluation of Eco-city based on the Fuzzy Matter Element Model (by Li Hong)
  • Creating Secure Urbanities: the city as a tapestry of layers of eco-infrastructures (by Betancourth)
  • Global Garden City Construction in Dualistic societies: A case study of Chengdu City, China (by B. Wen)
  • Growing food, feeding change: toward a holistic and dynamic approach of eco-city planning (by A. Vernay, T. Rahola, W. Ravesteijn)

A6: Sustainable transport systems

  • Xi Bao, Harbin Institute of Technology
  • Mu Rui, Delft University of Technology
  • Martijn Leijten, Delft University of Technology

Many global cities, especially in Asia, are growing fast, motorization is growing even faster. Planes and cars, however popular, will often lead to unsustainable solutions in the long run. What new sustainable transport concepts and solutions have been developed for (global) eco-cities? What are examples and experiences in this field?

Papers

  • Coordinated Planning Framework for the transportation facilities and ecological environment in a rapidly urbanized area- A case study of the Pearl River Delta of China (by: X. Lu, Z. Ma, Y. Lin)
  • Asset Management for the Dutch railway infrastructure (by: M. Leijten and J. Koppenjan)
  • The sustainable development of highway transport in China (by: Jie)
  • Real options for port infrastructure investments (by: P. Taneja, M. Aartsen, J. Annema, M. van Schuylenburg)

A7 Eco-city concepts and approaches

  • Meine Pieter van Dijk, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education
  • Soon-Thiam Khu, University of Surray

What visions, concepts and conceptual models have been developed for eco-cities? What eco-city indicators have evolved in various cities and countries around the world? What do they look like? To what extent are they universal and to what extent context-specific? How are they – or could they be – integrated in systems of indicators and in planning approaches? How do they work? What lessons can be drawn from their application in practice?

Papers

  • The mixed-use complex as Eco-City concept (by N. Fleurke)
  • Sustainability of New Urbanisation: cases from Istanbul (by: D. Unalan)
  • Criteria for a classification of ecological cities (by: M. van Dijk)

A8: Gaming-simulation: concepts and approaches

  • Ivo Wenzler,  Delft University of Technology / Accenture
  • Igor Mayer, Delft University of Technology
  • Qiqi Zhou, Delft University of Technology

In this track we aim to explore innovations in the field of (serious) gaming-simulation and examine its use and usefulness for city and infrastructure planning, in Western and Asian planning cultures.

Gaming-simulation for urban and infrastructure planning is an established field of practice since the 50s. Recent innovations in (commercial) game and simulation technology (e.g. 3D virtualization and human-computer interaction) provide new ways to combine advanced computer simulation with ‘playful’ human interaction. This is also referred to as serious gaming or applied gaming, i.e. the use of computer (supported) games for planning, learning, public policy making, etc

Papers

  • Urban strategy: Interactive spatial planning for sustainable cities (by: Borst, Lohman, Klerkx, Schelling, Tavasszy, Miedema)
  • Serious Gaming is Serious Business in Urban Planning (by: J. de Heer, T. de Groot, R. Hrynkiewicz)
  • Gaming the interrelation between rail infra and station area development – part 1 modeling the serious game ‘Sprintcity’ (by: Nefs, Gerretsen, Dooghe, Mayer, Meijer)
  • Gaming the interrelation between rail infra and station area development – part 2 preliminary insights and results from the Serious Game ‘Sprintcity’ (by: Mayer, Meijer, Gerretsen, Dooghe)

A9: Sustainable urban energy systems

  • Koen van Dam, Delft University of Technology (A9)
  • Liang Dapeng, Harbin Institute of Technology (A9)

Many new developments are taking place in the field of sustainable energy development which can be utilized when developing eco cities. Among them are solar energy, wind energy, and smart grid development. In combination, these can often lead to a dramatic reduction in the use of traditional fuel resources. This roundtable will discuss urban energy concepts, policy approaches and modeling approaches. Modeling of urban energy systems poses some specific challenges: the models have to be able to capture both the physical and social networks that exist in cities, and they have to include a wide range of infrastructure systems including transport, power, gas and heat. Furthermore, to study the effects of interactions between infrastructures we need a cross-sectoral view. What are the implications on model building and decision support? What paradigms, tools and theories can be applied to modeling urban energy systems?

Papers

  • Re-use of an ontology for modelling urban energy systems (by: K. van Dam, J. Keirstead)
  • Heat Demand Modeling at the scale of urban neighborhoods (by: Koch)
  • An approach towards socially acceptable energy saving policies via monetary instrument on the smart meter infrastructure (by: G. Deconinck, H. Joachain, F. Klopfert, L. Hoizemer, K. de Craemer, Z Qiu, K. Bachus, M. Hudon)
  • Design of energy systems in commercial buildings: an energy systems engineering approach (by: P. Liu, Z. Li, E. Pistikopoulos)

A10: Sustainable urban energy systems

  • James Keirstead, Imperial College
  • Geert Deconinck, Koninklijke Universisteit Leuven

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Many new developments are taking place in the field of sustainable energy development which can be utilized when developing eco cities. Among them are solar energy, wind energy, and smart grid development. In combination, these can often lead to a dramatic reduction in the use of traditional fuel resources. This roundtable will discuss urban energy concepts, policy approaches and modeling approaches. Modeling of urban energy systems poses some specific challenges: the models have to be able to capture both the physical and social networks that exist in cities, and they have to include a wide range of infrastructure systems including transport, power, gas and heat. Furthermore, to study the effects of interactions between infrastructures we need a cross-sectoral view. What are the implications on model building and decision support? What paradigms, tools and theories can be applied to modeling urban energy systems?

Papers

  • Towards an ontology of consumer acceptance in socio-technical energy systems (by: M. Sanden, K. van Dam)
  • Increasing Photovoltaics Grid Penetration in urban areas through active distribution systems: first large scale demonstration (by: T. van Loon, A. Woyte, F. Truyens, B. Bletterie, J. Reekers, B. Blazic, R. Engelen)
  • Global mechanisms to create energy efficient and low-carbon infrastructures: an Indian persepective (by: N. Narang, S. Dolly, E. Subrahamian, R. King, S. Krishnan)
  • Study of Popularization Policy of Clean Energy Vehicles using Life Cycle Assessment (by: T. Nonaka, M. Nakano)

A11: Infrastructure  regulation, governance and management around the world

  • Martin de Jong, Delft University of Technology/ Harbin University of Technology

There is a growing body of knowledge on the cross-national comparison of institutional frameworks and policy styles on how governments, authorities and regulators regulate, govern and manage the utility industries and the quality of service provision. This session aims top capitalise on these insights and covers aspects of  institutional and regulatory frameworks, innovative contracting  practices,  opportunistic and strategic behaviour, safeguarding and trading off public values and streamlining investments towards more sustainable urban transport, energy, telecom, waste and water infrastructure facilities.  Both theoretical contributions, in-depth national studies and cross-national comparisons will be warmly welcomed.

Papers

  • From critical infrastructure to infrastructure key node – featurse and functions (by: J. Mi, C. Yu, L. Xu and N. Yu)
  • Supporting the development of robust strategies for asset replacement in electricity distribution grid (by: W. Du, P. Bots, J. Slootweg)
  • Asian values and infrastructure development in China (by: M. de Jong)
  • A categorization of actor analysis methods (by: T. Lei)